Hoping Japanese Canon Workers Don’t Become the New Model for the Corporate World!

May 31, 2009

(ChattahBox)—“Lets rush–if we don’t then the company and world will perish.” Those chilling Orwellian words are printed across the floors of a large Canon Electronics factory in Japan. A stark reminder to factory workers to pick up their pace, as they are nothing more than cogs in a machine who are easily replaced.

The totalitarian atmosphere at Canon Electronics is eerily reminiscent of a scene straight from the pages of a George Orwell novel.

THX 1138, a science fiction movie from 1970, also comes to mind, where workers in the future toiled anonymously under the control of computers, where their names were taken from them and they were referred to only as randomly assigned letters and numbers, such as THX-1138.

If you think these descriptions are a bit exaggerated, think again. Hisashi Sakamaki, president of Canon Electronics, wrote a book, entitled “A company will do well if you get rid of the chairs and computers.”

In his book, Sakamaki seriously advocates the banning of chairs for corporate employees, believing instead, workers would concentrate better if standing. And as an added bonus, Sakamaki claims, a company can save money on chairs.

The workers at Canon resemble robotic drones; all wearing the same uniform of non-descript khakis and crisply pressed blue and white striped shirts. Smiles are a rare commodity in this factory, as workers hurry to complete their tasks

The factory bans the use of chairs for its workers, reserving such a luxury for only the top executives. Canon’s workers must stand while performing their tasks and attending meetings.

Even worse, sensors are embedded into the floors to detect the walking speed of workers. If a worker has the audacity to walk slower than 5 meters for every 3.6 seconds, an ear piercing siren and flashing lights are set off, reminding a worker of his or her slothfulness.

Sakamaki’s rationale for the floor sensors is that his factory is quite large and workers need the alarms as a reminder not to dilly-dally, wasting time and money.

Although Hisashi Sakamaki is strongly opposed to providing chairs for his workers, he doesn’t seem have any issues with sitting himself, as evidenced by photos of the company president lounging in a plush chair, while his employees are forced to stand for hours on end.

Let’s hope Canon Electronics’ bizarre policies don’t start a trend and become the new model for the corporate world.

Source


Comments

3 Responses to “Hoping Japanese Canon Workers Don’t Become the New Model for the Corporate World!”

  1. Hoping Japanese Canon Workers Don’t Become the New Model for the … - Chattahbox.com « AddingInfo.com on May 31st, 2009 4:53 pm

    […] Canon Electronics factory in Japan. A stark reminder to factory workers to pick up their … Read Full Post: Hoping Japanese Canon Workers Don’t Become the New Model for the … – Chattah… Adding Related Info:GM Set to Build Tiny Fuel-Efficient Cars in the US – Chattahbox.comNewegg.com […]

  2. vanilla ice on June 1st, 2009 2:11 pm

    Our globalist leaders have a similar vision.. export your job to china and import 25 million illegal mexicans, and wha-laa.. a decade later the american middle class has disappeared,
    along with its opportunity and options..
    welcome to droneland.. ‘land of the free’ replaced by ‘do as your told’

  3. That’s How Capitalism Works, Dummy « Missives from Marx on June 3rd, 2009 1:06 pm

    […] I recently ran across this news/opinion piece over at ChattahBox.com titled “Hoping Japanese Canon Workers Don’t Become the New Model for the Corporate World.” Here are a few selections: “Lets rush–if we don’t then the company and world will […]

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