Book Claims Frederick Bailey Deeming Was Jack the Ripper

April 13, 2009

(ChattahBox) — There is a not so new theory being rehashed to the identity of JACK the Ripper, who has remained a mystery for more than 120 years. Dr. Geoff Crawford an academic from Templestowe, who became interested in the case more than a decade ago and started researching the case for a book,  believes the East End killer was a former Melbourne resident.
About a year ago that Dr Crawford discovered connections between the notorious London murderer and former Windsor resident Frederick Bailey Deeming, according to a report in The Mannigham Leader.

Deeming lived in Britain in the 1880s, settling in Rainhill near Liverpool where he was later discovered to have killed his first wife and their four children.   He later emigrated to Melbourne, where he was eventually hanged in Old Melbourne Gaol in 1892 for murder. He was so hated that a crowd of 12,000 gathered on his execution day and cheered uproariously when Demming was declared dead. While in prison, Deeming told his fellow inmates that he was indeed Jack the Ripper, but never confessed to authorities.

According to Dr Crawford, their profiles matched – the known crimes of Deeming, which included a murder he committed while in Melbourne, were just as horrific as those committed by Jack the Ripper.

Ripper experts have claimed Deeming could not be the notorious killer because he was in South Africa at the time of the murders, although some confusion remains over the exact dates of his travel.

Crawford has admitted he lacks definitive proof for his theory and now wants to extract DNA from Deeming’s skull to see if it matches DNA found on letters written by Jack the Ripper.


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