Robert Culp of ‘I Spy’ Fame Dies at 79, After a Fall

March 25, 2010

(ChattahBox)—Actor Robert Culp died outside of his Hollywood Hills home on Wednesday after falling and hitting his head. He was 79. Culp was best known for his role in the iconic 60s NBC TV series “I Spy” and as an aging swinger in the 1969 movie “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice.”

Culp’s role as Kelly Robinson in “I Spy,” as an undercover secret agent traveling the world as a professional tennis bum and ladies man, earned him three Emmy nominations, but he never won. The awards went to his close friend and co-star Bill Cosby, who played Culp’s tennis coach and fellow secret agent in the popular TV series. “I Spy” made history, as the first television series to cast a black actor in a lead role.

Culp is also remembered for his memorable role in the movie “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” which examined the pathos of two suburban married couples involved in a swinging lifestyle.

Culp was a close friend of Hugh Hefner’s and a frequent visitor to the Playboy Mansion. Hefner, said he was “absolutely stunned” to learn of his friend’s death.

Culp was married five times and he is survived by his sons Joseph, Joshua, Jason and daughters Rachel and Samantha; and five grandchildren.

See the LA Times for more.


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One Response to “Robert Culp of ‘I Spy’ Fame Dies at 79, After a Fall”

  1. Robert Culp of ‘i Spy’ Fame Dies At 79, After a Fall | Chattahbox … on March 26th, 2010 6:01 am

    [...] Hills home on Wednesday after falling and hitting his head. He was 79. Culp was best known for.Read More Cancel [...]

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