Tiger Woods Just Does It: Shoots New Nike Commercial

March 26, 2010

(ChattahBox)—-Tiger Woods is moving ahead with his campaign to rehabilitate his reputation and brand, which was severely damaged by an unseemly sex scandal involving over a dozen extramarital affairs, with Vegas cocktail hostesses, porn stars and at least one pancake house waitress. Throughout the media frenzy surrounding Woods’ scandal, many of his sponsors dumped him, but Nike stayed loyal. Now, it’s being reported that Woods shot a new commercial for Nike, which is his first spot since the scandal erupted after he crashed his SUV on Thanksgiving night.

After the scandal, he disappeared from the public eye, entered a rehabilitation facility for sexual addiction and appeared before cameras to issue a public apology. Woods then, gave two tightly controlled interviews with ESPN and the golf channel.

His new Nike commercial would mark his return to the airwaves, which were flooded with multiple Woods’ advertisements, before his fall from grace.

TMZ reports that the new Nike spot was shot in Woods’ home town at “the Isleworth Country Club golf course in his neighborhood in Windermere, Florida Thursday morning.”

It’s doubtful that the famous Nike Tag Line “Just Do It” would be used for Woods’ new spot. The Nike phrase was roundly mocked in the wake of Tiger’s serial adultery.


Comments

One Response to “Tiger Woods Just Does It: Shoots New Nike Commercial”

  1. CLB on March 28th, 2010 6:13 pm

    The fact is that no matter how many golf tournaments he wins again, Tiger Woods will never be seen by the public as they did before. Tiger’s image of a clean, decent, trustworthy man is gone for ever.

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