Study Shows That Beer, Not Water, Is The Best Hydration

June 6, 2009

Spain (ChattahBox) – A study conducted by Granada University has shown that hydrating with beer after a work out is preferable to water.

According to Professor Manuel Garzon, a member of the University’s medical department, beer has been shown to be much more hydrating, and just generally better for you, after any kind of strenuous physical activity.

The study used 25 students for their theory. Each one was asked to run on a treadmill in a room set at 104 F., allowing them to lose a great deal of their water reserves and electrolytes.

Afterward, they were given something to drink, half a Spanish lager, and the other half, water. Those who drank the beer perked up more quickly, and seemed better hydrated then those given water.

Researchers believe that it has to do with the greater nutrition content in beer, such as with sugars, carbs, salts, and calories.


Comments

2 Responses to “Study Shows That Beer, Not Water, Is The Best Hydration”

  1. Treadmill running | Treadmill Village on June 6th, 2009 3:06 pm

    […] Spain (ChattahBox) – A study conducted by Granada University has shown that hydrating with beer after a work out is preferable to water. According to Professor Manuel Garzon, a member of the University’s medical department, beer has been shown to Best Treadmill News […]

  2. Ben on June 20th, 2009 3:52 pm

    The title indicates that beer is the best method of rehydration. However, there are only two drinks in the study, beer and water, which means that the comparative (better) rather than the superlative (best), should be used.
    The study does not show that beer is the best way to rehydrate; it only showed that it is better than plain water.

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