Study Gives Evidence Of Comet Creating 1908 Tunguska Event

June 25, 2009

US (ChattahBox) – A new study done by Cornell University has shown that the 1908 Tungaska event was indeed caused by a comet, a long held theory that has been believed by many scientists.

“It’s almost like putting together a 100-year-old murder mystery. The evidence is pretty strong that the Earth was hit by a comet in 1908,” Michael Kelley, the lead researcher on the project, was quoted as saying in  [EurekAlert].

According to Kelley and his team, noctilucent clouds (the highest cloud formed in Earth’s atmosphere) were formed from the water and ice vapor that came from the explosion in Siberia. They also believe it was this vapor that caused the bright sky that could be seen as far as London. That would mean the particles would have to travel more than 3,000 miles.

“There is a mean transport of this material for tens of thousands of kilometers in a very short time, and there is no model that predicts that,” Kelley explained.

“It’s totally new and unexpected physics.”

The study has been published in the June 24, 2009 edition of Geophysical Research Letters.


Comments

One Response to “Study Gives Evidence Of Comet Creating 1908 Tunguska Event”

  1. geological mountaineering astronomer on June 28th, 2009 10:22 pm

    the PERMAFROST two-level LAYER impact deep under the surface cone_crater profile of several dumped lakes there : (not necessarily including Lake Cheko) as well as a variant series of non-regular asymmetrical
    surface perimeters
    are similar to those
    I observed on Mars

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