Proxies Becoming More Popular In Heavily Censored Countries

February 19, 2010

(ChattahBox) – Companies are cashing in on more powerful programs and proxies that allow censored countries to bypass the blocks put on the web.

According to Patrick Lin, who offers the program “Puff” through his California-based company, China makes up 60% of all of his users, and Iran makes up 40%, with more than 60,000 daily users.

The programs are most commonly used to access blocked pages like Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, YouTube, and various media and news sites.

With more and more of those sites being blocked, including Gmail by Iran, with China possibly to follow, the millions of people currently going for these programs is expected to increase significantly.

The trick for these companies is not finding people who want their technology, but finding ways to avoid government blocks as more and more users are seen using these ‘security’ bypass programs.

Already a number of proxies have been blocked in China.

Source


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