‘YouTube Instant’ Creator Still in College, Nabs Job Offer Via Twitter

September 11, 2010

(ChattahBox Technology News)—Feross Aboukhadijeh, a college junior studying computer science at Stanford, saw a challenge in Google Instant, the search engine’s giant new service that spits out search results, before you finish typing your query. What if the same service existed exclusively for YouTube searches? Within hours, Aboukhadijeh finished the coding and suddenly the Internet now had “YouTube Instant.” As word spread about the new service, Aboukhadijeh became an Internet sensation. And he was even offered a job with YouTube, via Twitter. But unfortunately, YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley was too late, because he is already interning with another tech giant. The college wiz kid is working for Facebook.

Aboukhadijeh appears unfazed by his recent Internet stardom, but he can’t help bragging a little. He created “YouTube Instant” with just three-hours of coding after all. On his personal website, Feross.org he exclaims, “Psh… Google Instant? I built YouTube Instant.”

Aboukhadijeh was interviewed by Peter Kafka at All Things Digital. And he came across as a very smart kid who likes to use his skills to create fun Internet experiences.

Kafka: What are you specializing in at Stanford?

Aboukhadijeh: I’m a Junior in the Stanford CS program. I’m interested in Internet technology, building websites, and computer security. I really enjoy building products that entertain and delight people, like YouTube Instant. [...]

Kafka: What’s the plan after you graduate?

Aboukhadijeh: One day, I’d like to start a company that becomes the next Google and fundamentally changes the world for the better.

And why not–someone has to, right?


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