Facebook’s Project Titan Has Gmail in its Sights

November 13, 2010

(ChattahBox Technology News)—Facebook developers have finally taken user complaints about its annoying messaging platform to heart. Come Monday, Facebook will be directly completing with Google’s popular Gmail with its own web-based email service, currently dubbed Project Titan. It’s hard to know these days who is really taking over our online existence, Facebook or Google. But Facebook thinks it will win this battle. Inside the inner sanctum of Facebook, the new email client is called “Gmail killer.”

According to Tech Crunch, a special event in San Francisco on Monday, will unveil Facebook’s Gmail Killer:

“Our understanding is that this is more than just a UI refresh for Facebook’s existing messaging service with POP access tacked on. Rather, Facebook is building a full-fledged webmail client, and while it may only be in early stages come its launch Monday, there’s a huge amount of potential here.”

But will Project Titan really take out Google’s Gmail? Probably not, but it makes for good PR.

“Tacking a real webmail product on top of those vanity URLs and Facebook connect is something even Google may shudder at. Gmail killer? I don’t think so. But a strong product move nonetheless.”


Comments

One Response to “Facebook’s Project Titan Has Gmail in its Sights”

  1. Jay Chambers on November 13th, 2010 12:45 pm

    Yes, Facebook’s ‘Titan’ email client could certainly be a game changer –

    I have written about some of the great things we could expect from ‘Titan’, including a more social inbox – but also written about the ‘cons’ such as spam concerns stemming from facebook profile names and more:

    http://jyml.me/9tqyny

    Hope you enjoy,

    Jay

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