Boy In Balloon Found In Attic, Authorities Confused

October 16, 2009

Colorado (ChattahBox) – The 6-year-old boy who was believed to have been in a Mylar balloon as it took to the sky was found safe in his home’s attic, leaving authorities confused as to the brother’s story, and exactly what happened.

Falcon Heene apparently went up to the attic to play with some toys, and fell asleep in a box. His brother had previously said in several interview with police that he saw Falcon get into the balloon, though they are unsure about when this occurred.

“He says he was hiding in the attic,” Falcon’s father, Richard Heene, was quoted by CNN. “He says it’s because I yelled at him. I’m sorry I yelled at him.”

When being interviewed on Larry King Live, Heene asked his son why he didn’t come from his hiding place when he was called. Falcon replied, “You guys said we did this for the show.”

His father looked uncomfortable, but said that he must have meant the media coverage of the event, as camera crews swarmed their property, and stated that he was ‘appalled’ that the substitute host, Wolf Blitzer, questioned him further on what his son may have meant.

Officials are trying to find out exactly what happened in the case that caused the Colorado Air National Guard and Federal Aviation Administration to be put on a rescue mission.

So far, authorities believe that the case is genuine.

The Heene family have been previous guests on the television show ‘Wife Swap’, where a family switches mothers to live one another’s lives for two weeks.

Source


Comments

One Response to “Boy In Balloon Found In Attic, Authorities Confused”

  1. Amy on October 16th, 2009 3:52 pm

    I am glad the boy is O.K. but I hope it was not a publicity stunt.

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