CIA Continues to Stonewall Release of JFK Assassination Files

October 17, 2009

(ChattahBox)—The curious refusal of the C.I.A. to release documents surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy, dating back to 1963 has only served to inflame persistent conspiracy theories and doubts about the circumstances of the former President’s death, according to a piece published in the New York Times on Friday.

The controversial and secret files cover the activities of C.I.A operative George E. Joannides, who worked with an anti-Castro Cuban group, funded by the spook agency, which battled with Lee Harvey Oswald, a Fidel Castro sympathizer, before he took the life of JFK.

The secret documents dealing with the operation undertaken by C.I.A agent George E. Joannides in his work with the anti-Castro Directorio Revolucionario Estudantil, or Cuban Student Directorate, are being heavily protected by the C.I.A. The group received $50,000 a month from the C.I.A. in 1963. During that time, it’s known that Lee Harvey Oswald had contacts with the anti-Castro group.

And Jefferson Morley, 51, a former Washington Post reporter and the author of a 2008 biography of a former C.I.A. station chief in Mexico, is determined to get his hands on the secret files. Morley hired James H. Lesar, a Washington lawyer specializing in Freedom of Information Act lawsuits and sued the C.I.A, fighting them in court for six-years, before he finally won a small victory on appeal.

Last year the C.I.A. released just enough documents to fuel Morley’s continued interest in George E. Joannides, but withheld about 295 more, from the 1960s and ’70s. Morley is convinced the remaining documents are hiding long-held secrets that would make a blockbuster of a story. The case operative’s contacts with Lee Harvey Oswald may help shed light on the circumstances surrounding Kennedy’s assassination.

“I know there’s a story here. The confirmation is that the C.I.A. treats these documents as extremely sensitive,” said Morley.

The C.I.A says they are merely protecting sensitive details of past operations. “The methods of defeating or deterring covert action in the 1960s and 1970s can still be instructive to the United States’ current enemies,” claims the agency.

To be sure, the story of the shady case officer, George E. Joannides, who died at the age 68 in 1990, has all the makings of a good spy novel. Years after JFK’s assassination by Lee Harvey Oswald, Joannides resurfaced in 1978, as the liaison to the House Select Committee on Assassinations.

But the committee was never informed of Joannides’ former work with the anti-Castro group and any involvement he may have had with Lee Harvey Oswald. Morley uncovered the spy agency’s deception in placing Joannides, as a congressional liaison in 2001, and has become convinced that his real role was to torpedo the investigative work of the committee.

The deceptions from the C.I.A. regarding the Kennedy assassination, began with the Warren Commission, and fueled the conspiracy theories surrounding the assassination to this day.

Read the entire New York Times piece for more of this intriguing story.


Comments

5 Responses to “CIA Continues to Stonewall Release of JFK Assassination Files”

  1. And They Keep These Files at Area 51 « Around The Sphere on October 17th, 2009 1:58 pm

    […] Chattah Box: The controversial and secret files cover the activities of C.I.A operative George E. Joannides, who worked with an anti-Castro Cuban group, funded by the spook agency, which battled with Lee Harvey Oswald, a Fidel Castro sympathizer, before he took the life of JFK. […]

  2. bill on October 17th, 2009 7:16 pm

    unbelievable that some assert there was no conspiracy. I think it was mid-level CIA operatives who managed it and got the shooters, after an o.k. from the heads of the military industrial complex, as well as those who believed JFK was too reckless over the way he handled the Cuban Missile Crisis — — i.e., we should have bombed them before the nukes became operative, and never again would they allow such recklessness in a President. They saw JFK as a danger to the existence of the USA because after the nukes became operative in Cuba, there was no longer the possibility of a surprise attack, and everything depended on the luck of negotiation. Gen. Curtiss LeMay was especially upset.

  3. jeff on October 18th, 2009 8:39 pm

    bill, absolutely no chance of Russia (the owner of the “inop” nukes) seeing this unprovoked bombing of Cuba as an attack on Russia!!!! yea, after the raid, Russia would have most likely said: well, that didnt work. Kennedy saved Oswald’s life; not that Oswald cared. jeff

  4. Mike on October 19th, 2009 3:57 pm

    Interesting!

  5. Brenda Masoner on March 10th, 2010 5:30 pm

    I find it so sad that the government will not release the information. The american public has a right to know what really happened although most have a good idea .

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