Mocksite: Joe Barton Wants to Apologize to ‘The Confederacy for Taking all Your Slaves Away’

June 18, 2010

(ChattahBox)—In the wake of Rep. Joe Barton’s (R-TX) stunning apology to BP, a foreign corporation, for the creation of a Gulf Coast victims disaster fund, calling it a “$20 billion shakedown” and “slush fund,” a mocking website has popped up online, named JoeBartonWouldLikeToApologize.com. The website provides visitors with a constant-changing menu of satirical apologies made by Congressman Barton, such as Joe Barton Would Like to Apologize To: “The confederacy for taking all your slaves away. Totally a shakedown move on our part. Sorry.”

A quick Whois domain search reveals, Mathew Honan, a freelance writer from San Francisco is the mad genius behind the website. His Linkedin page, also lists him as a contributing editor for Wired Magazine.

With a quick click of the refresh button on your Web browser, a constant stream of mocking Joe Barton apologies appear, including an apology to England for the revolution.

Below are a few for your enjoyment:

Joe Barton Would Like to Apologize To:

  • England about that whole Revolution thing. You can totally have the East Coast back now we’re pretty much done with it.
  • The oil and gas industry for taking 1.5 million of your dollars and not lobbying harder for you guys. You do such good work. Here, have a pelican.
  • Tony Hayward. Totally forgot to tickle your balls. Know how you love that. Want to go for another round?

Since Barton’s outrageous apology to BP during a hearing of the the Energy and Commerce Committee, of which he is the ranking Republican member, he apologized for his “misconstrued misconstruction,” and GOP leaders condemned his remarks.


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