Gov. Jindal Rejects National Guard for Spill, Turns to Prayer Instead

June 25, 2010

(ChattahBox)—Bobby Jindal, Republican governor of Louisiana was against big government before he was for it. Since the Gulf oil disaster, Jindal has been grandstanding in front of every camera and microphone within a 100-mile radius, taking every opportunity to attack the Obama administration for not providing his state with the federal resources needed to clean up the spill. “We need action down here on the Gulf Coast not just words,” complained Jindal to ABC News last week. And Back in May, Jindal complained about Obama’s response, telling Jake Tapper on ABC’s “This Week,” “I think there could have been a greater sense of urgency.”

About that urgency thing. President Obama authorized up to 6,000 National Guard troops two-months ago, to help in cleanup efforts in Louisiana. But Jindal has only activated 1,053, according to a scathing CBS report that aired last night, despite loudly and publicly complaining for months that he has been denied the resources he needs by the Obama administration. Jindal instead, is “pointing fingers,” noted CBS News. And that’s not all he is doing. When he grows tired of political grandstanding, screeching for sand berms that experts say may make the problem worse and demanding the end to the moratorium on offshore oil drilling, Jindal seeks divine inspiration from up above.

Jindal took the time to issue a state proclamation declaring June 27th as a “Statewide Day of Prayer” for perseverance through the oil spill disaster. In his proclamation, Jindal again mentioned the sense of urgency:

“WHEREAS, Coastal parish leaders from all along the coast have come together to implement their own ideas to protect our waters and our shores, often fighting to convey the sense of urgency and quick action that this crisis demands”

And Jindal held a prayer vigil at the end of the legislative session on Monday, in which the religious leaders in attendance participated in the laying on of the hands upon Jindal:

“Neither know we what to do: but our eyes are upon Thee.” (2 Chron 20:12). This was one of the confessions that was made at Memorial Hall at the Louisiana State Capitol on Monday as lawmakers, pastors, and intercessors joined Representative Regina Barrow, Senator Sharon Broome, and Governor Bobby Jindal for a Prayer Vigil concerning the Deepwater Horizon Oil Explosion. Both ends of the political spectrum joined together to ask God’s hand to move where man’s efforts have failed. Mr. Earl Taylor’s booming rendition of “Amazing Grace” reverberated through the hall and was a fitting ending to a very intense yet successful legislative session.”

That’s all well and good, but President Obama, during his address to the nation, urged the Gulf governors “to activate these troops as soon as possible.” It’s doubtful that National Guard troops are activated by prayer.

Jindal has instead decided, to stand in front of the cameras and accuse the Obama administration of not providing his state with resources.

The CBS report pointed out Jindal’s hypocrisy. “Gov. Bobby Jindal’s message has been loud and clear, using language such as “We will only be winning this war when we’re actually deploying every resource,” “They (the federal government) can provide more resources” and “It’s clear the resources needed to protect our coast are still not here.”

When asked by the CBS reporter, why Jindal has refused to activate the Guard troops, he made up some nonsense placing the blame on the government. Jindal claimed he asked for all 6,000 troops, but was told additional approval was needed.

“Actually we asked the White House to approve the initial 6,000,” Jindal said. “What they came back and said is the Coast Guard and BP had to authorize individual tasks,” said Jindal.

Well, Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen quickly shot down Jindal’s falsehood, saying there is “nothing standing in the governor’s way from utilizing more National Guard troops.” In fact, most requests for activation have been approved within 24-hours.

Jindal’s office, realizing the governor was caught in a falsehood, admitted to CBS before the report went on air, that Jindal did not in fact request the activation of additional Guard troops beyond the initial 1,053.

“Now Jindal’s office acknowledged to CBS News the governor has not specifically asked for more Guard troops to be deployed.”

Jindal’s office did not provide an explanation. And CBS was unable to explain Jindal’s erratic behavior.

“Whether it’s simple confusion or the infusion of politics into the spill, the fact remains thousands of helping hands remain waiting to be used,” concluded CBS.

Watch it:

Photo Source: Gov. Jindal official website


Comments

3 Responses to “Gov. Jindal Rejects National Guard for Spill, Turns to Prayer Instead”

  1. marty1234 on June 25th, 2010 9:40 pm

    When things get tough….We pray

  2. Gary on June 25th, 2010 11:18 pm

    Billy Nungesser answers why, on CBS news a day before, I wonder why CBS forgot it? Unbiased news huh…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4OfJEeib9g

  3. Tanin on June 26th, 2010 9:09 am

    “And Jindal held a prayer vigil at the end of the legislative session on Monday, in which the religious leaders in attendance participated in the laying of the hands upon Jinda”

    I can’t believe this religion/government mixing. They’re doing it all wrong. As we all know requests for fixing oil leaks start with sacrificing a goat, then chanting Hebrew magic verses and THEN move on to the laying of hands on the tribal leader. Doesn’t anyone respect bronze age Middle Eastern rituals anymore? Have they forgotten that if they do it wrong, their donkeys will refuse to eat and die and their crops will fail of the curse of the god?

Got something to say? **Please Note** - Comments may be edited for clarity or obscenity, and all comments are published at the discretion of ChattahBox.com - Comments are the opinions of the individuals leaving them, and not of ChattahBox.com or its partners. - Please do not spam or submit comments that use copyright materials, hearsay or are based on reports where the supposed fact or quote is not a matter of public knowledge are also not permitted.