Bush Has ‘Sickening Feeling’ About WMD Error, But Won’t Apologize

November 9, 2010

(ChattahBox U.S. News) — George W. Bush believes that no one was “more shocked or angry” than he was when weapons of mass destruction weren’t discovered in Iraq, but told Matt Lauer during a Today show interview that he never considered apologizing to the American people because that would send the message that he made a wrong decision. Instead, Bush decided to focus on what went wrong, msnbc.com reports.

In an interview to discuss his memoir “Decision Points,” Bush also said that eyeballing Hurricane Katrina’s devastation from the window of Air Force One was a bad idea, but that spending time in the region would have diverted law enforcement away from hurricane victims, he told Lauer. When Kanye West later said during a telethon that Bush’s reaction to the disaster indicated that the president didn’t “care about black people,” Bush felt it was one of the most “disgusting” moments in his presidency, msnbc.com reports.

Bush acknowledged an error in judgment for standing under a banner that read “Mission Accomplished” in 2003 after Saddam Hussein’s statue crashed to the ground. He also said that after the Abu Gharib prison scandal, he considered accepting Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld’s resignation, but couldn’t think of anyone who would replace Rumsfeld, so he kept him in his post for two more years, msnbc.com reports.


Comments

One Response to “Bush Has ‘Sickening Feeling’ About WMD Error, But Won’t Apologize”

  1. Morely Dotes on November 9th, 2010 9:50 am

    George W. Bush was the worst President in American history. Period. He’s stupid, gullible, narrow-minded, superstitious, and arrogant.

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