Details Of Jon Venables Arrest Alleges ‘Serious Sex Offense’

March 6, 2010

UK (ChattahBox) – The man who was released after torturing and killing a toddler at the age of ten is back again, and sources claim on a serious sex-related charge.

Jon Venables was arrested as one of two ten year old boys that lured two-year-old James Bulger from a shopping mall and beat him to death.

He served until he was 18 and then was released with a new identity, causing an outcry from the public that was ignored.

Now, Venables is back in prison and is allegedly being charged with an unspecified sex charge that is being called “extremely serious”.

“I was unable to give further details of the reasons for Jon Venables’ return to custody, because it was not in the public interest to do so,” Justice Secretary Jack Straw said, after he was accused of withholding information from both the public and the original victim’s mother.

“Our motivation throughout has been solely to ensure that some extremely serious allegations are properly investigated and that justice is done.”

The case has always been a highly charged one, with many accusing the Ministry of Justice of allowing a dangerous, sadistic killer go free after committing a heinous and deliberate crime.

New details that have increased the controversy have since been released; for example, Venables has continued to regularly visit Liverpool despite it breaking the terms of his release.

It has also been found that during his time being served for murder, he was allowed to leave his confinement and make ‘pleasure visits’ to places like the beach with other teens.

The case is drawing wide scrutiny as to how prison time is handled for underage offenders for certain crimes.

Source


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