Why Did We Fall For The Latest Bigfoot Hoax?

August 17, 2008

One question that has been on my mind this past weekend, is why exactly did we fall for yet another Bigfoot hoax?......Hollywood (ChattahBox) – One question that has been on my mind this past weekend, is why exactly did we fall for yet another Bigfoot hoax?

Last week, it was announced that two men, Matthew Whitton and Rick Dyer, found the dead body of Bigfoot in the woods of northern Georgia.

Immediately, as soon as the news broke, the Internet went crazy, with many in full support of these two men, who announced a press conference later in teh week.

The two men ran their site, SearchingForBigfoot.com, and garnered quite a bit of attention from the whole ordeal.

They announced details on Bigfoot, stating that he is 7 feet, 7 inches tall, had big teeth, reddish fur, etc.

They even released a very fuzzy picture of the dead body, stating that they put it in a freezer to keep it “fresh.”

They promised DNA evidence and more at their big press conference last Friday in California, but failed to deliver anything substantial.

Instead, what many quickly realized was that this was just another publicity stunt involving the legendary mythical creature known as Bigfoot.

So why did we believe it? It is pretty common for people to want to believe a story such as this, as it is truly something that interests many.

It is always interesting when a new discovery is made, especially of something which in the past was believed to be fake all along.

In the end though, what we are left with is another Bigfoot hoax, and two guys who are trying their best to cash in by seling merchandise on their Bigfoot site.


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